You don't occassionally say, "Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock

Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock is the same amount of time to say that follows the 2-second Rule and is equivalent as the distance of one car length for each 10 mph of speed.  While traveling at highway speed, it's nearly impossible to judge one car length for each 10 mph of speed.  This makes it easy to avoid tailgating.

How do you use, Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock?  Merely pick a point in the road where the back of the car in front of you is.  Then start saying Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock in your normal speech speed.  If you've passed that point before you said the second Tock, then you were tailgating and you were putting yourself and the passengers in your car and in the car ahead of you in danger.  You will eventually subconsciously determine the safe distance between you and the car in front of you without constantly having to say, in your mind, Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock.

At dusk and night time:  Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock = 3-second Rule.

Wet, slippery roads:  Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock = 4-second Rule.

Icy roads:  Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock, Tick, Tock = 5-second Rule.

Safety Rule #1.  If it's dark with wet, icy roads while pouring rain or heavy blowing snow: stay home.
Safety Rule #2.  Revert to Safety Rule #1.
Safety Rule #3.  Revert to Safety Rule #1.

Passengers are responsible for their own safety; therefore, it is imperative that they also do the Tick Tock.  If the driver is tailgating, then it's the passengers duty to tell the driver that he is.  No excuses.  If you didn't and end up dead, or wind up in a hospital it's as much your fault as the driver.  

Don't be a cowardly passenger.  It's your life he's playing with.

http://www.youarestupidif.com/2017/04/you-tailgate.html